Research Areas

Current Faculty:
Scott D Sommerfeldt, Tim Leishman
Current Students:
Zac Jensen
Have you ever wished you could turn off the noise in your car, on an airplane, or coming from your roommate’s room? Using active noise control, you can at least turn down the volume. Active noise control is the practice of playing “anti-noise” that will control the undesired noise.
Current Faculty:
Scott D. Sommerfeldt
Current Students:
Matt Calton
Acoustic resonators are used to amplify or absorb sound in very specific frequency ranges. Car mufflers and bass traps absorb unwanted noise, while the body of a guitar or a violin amplifies certain frequencies.
Current Faculty:
Kent L Gee, Tracianne B Neilsen
Current Students:
Blaine M Harker
Noise from powerful commercial and military airplanes has become a concern for both the flight personnel who work around jets and the communities near airports. One method to better measure jet noise is beamforming, which measures acoustic signals at a distance, then reconstructs sound sources in the jet plume.
Current Faculty:
Kent L Gee, Tracianne B Neilsen
Current Students:
Darren Torrie
Several research projects here at BYU involve modeling high amplitude sound sources such as jets and rockets. Acoustical intensity is key calculation in making the modeling process more reliable.
Current Faculty:
Kent L Gee, Tracianne B Neilsen
Current Students:
Brent Reichman, Kyle Miller
Nonlinear acoustics deals primarily with extremely loud sounds. Though these could be any loud sounds, at BYU a majority of our nonlinear research has to do with jet and rocket noise. Though these sources are loud enough to pose a significant risk of hearing damage, nonlinear effects can make them even more potentially damaging!
Current Faculty:
Tim Leishman
Current Students:
Jenny Lund
Auralization is, according to Vorlander,”the technique of creating audible sound files from numerical (simulated, measured, or synthesized) data.”

 


Acoustics research at BYU is strongly cross-disciplinary in character and focuses on the following areas: active noise and vibration control, sound-structure interaction, nonlinear acoustics, audio acoustics and architectural acoustics. The research in acoustics is both experimental and computational in nature and includes simulation and measurement of physical systems, as well as signal processing. Computer facilities are readily available with a number of powerful software packages. In addition, the laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art acoustic equipments and various anechoic and reverberation chambers that are used for experimental verification of studies.

Active Noise Control

Architectural Acoustics

Rocket & Jet Noise

Ultrasonic Noise & Transmission

Active Structural Acoustic Control


 

 Weekly research meetings are held are held in conjunction with the ASA Student Chapter.

If you wish to get involved with research or help out the ARG in any way, check out this list of ways to GET INVOLVED.

Peer Reviewed Publications

A list of peer reviewed publications of the ARG since 1960, and other acoustics publications pre-ARG (meaning pre-student involvement) may be found here.

National/International Conference Presentations

Students and faculty at Brigham Young University have presented in conventions of many professional societies including the Acoustical Society of America, the Audio Engineering Society, and the Institute of Noise Control and Engineering to present their research.  A partial listing of BYU ARG conference presentation citations since 2002 can be found here.